Archive for the 'This Just In' Category

21
Apr
09

This Just In: Thirst Promo Shots

thirstpromo01

Okay, it’s beginning to seem like Park Chan-wook’s upcoming priest-turned-vampire film Thirst is the only movie I’m writing about here, but after all it is the new film from the director of the Vengeance Trilogy, it does star one of Korea’s best actors (Song Kang-ho), and it could very possibly be a breakthrough role for Dasepo Naughty Girls starlet Kim Ok-bin. So every new bit of info on this film is a huge point of interest to me (and hopefully, you too if you’re still reading), including these new promo shots which will run in the Korean editions of Vogue and Cosmopolitan leading up to next week’s theatrical release.  You can peep the full set here.

Advertisements
09
Mar
09

This Just In: Wong Kar-wai Officially a Hollywood Player

wkw01
Regardless of how bright Wong’s future is, he’s gotta wear shades.

Well this is certainly troubling. According to Variety, arthouse dierector’s arthouse director Wong Kar-wai (2046, In the Mood for Love) has just signed with Hollywood powerhouse talent agency CAA. It may not have worked for John Woo or Ringo Lam, but I’m sure Wong will fare better on these shores than his fellow Hong Kong ex-pat directors. I mean, it’s not like he’s going to make a sub-par English-language movie that comes across as a bad imitation of a Wong Kar-wai film, right? Oh, wait…

27
Feb
09

Sneak Peek at Ashes of Time Redux Bonus Features

Mark Pollard at Kung Fu Cinema just posted a handful of preview clips from the extras accompanying Sony Pictures Classics’ upcoming DVD release of Wong Kar-wai’s Ashes of Time Redux (I tried to include one here, but was having some trouble with embedding the clip so instead I’ve included the trailer). Some of you may be thinking, “I don’t really get into kung fu flicks, man…” but let’s not forget this is Wong Kar-wai (along with cinematographer Christopher Doyle) we’re talking about. While the film incorporates characters and situations adapted from Louis Cha’s wu xia novel “Legend of the Condor Heroes,” and does indeed contain scenes of swordplay, saying this film is about martial arts is like saying Hitchcock’s Psycho is about Marion Crane stealing a load of cash. Ashes of Time is a kind of tone poem on love, loss and memory, and the rare kind of film that’s so densely layered with tiny details of plot and character that it actually becomes richer with repeated viewings. And speaking of becoming richer, the Redux in the title refers to Wong’s loving overhaul of his 1994 classic. It’s been re-mastered, re-edited and color-adjusted, and none other than Yo-Yo Ma has added haunting cello solos to composer Frankie Chan’s original score. The result is a martial arts film unlike anything that came before, and unlike anything that’s likely to come after.

(via Kung Fu Cinema)

17
Feb
09

This Just In: Shinjuku Incident Won’t Screen in Mainland China

The New York Times has picked up on reports of director Derek Yee’s refusal to trim scenes of violence in his latest film Shinjuku Incident, thus ensuring it won’t screen in the highly lucrative mainland Chinese market. The film, a dark tale of Chinese refugees dealing with the Yakuza in Japan, stars Jackie Chan and Daniel Wu among others, and supposedly marks Chan’s first non-martial arts/stunt-driven role in his modern career. Yee said he did attempt to cut the offending scenes (including stabbings and the amputation of a hand), but when he screened the truncated version for the film’s producers they simply felt it was “incomplete.” Chan, who is of course a huge draw in the mainland and is also a financial backer on the film, agreed with the director’s decision. Kudos to Yee for not rolling over for the sake of profit, though it will be interesting to see how this plays out both for the success of this film as well as for future releases with violent, political or otherwise controversial content. At any rate, I’m sure mainland sales of Shinjuku bootlegs will be huge.

30
Jan
09

This Just In: Faye Dunaway (Verbally) Bitchslaps Hilary Duff

duffvsdunaway

First off: I don’t intend to post gossip items here on anything approaching a regular basis, but this one is a perfect storm of cattiness that’s just too good to pass up. There was quite a bit of buzz earlier in the week about Variety’s scoop that Hilary Duff (star of dreck such as Raise Your Voice, which I heroically endured previously reviewed here) had been cast in a remake of 1967’s Bonnie & Clyde. Oh wait, excuse me—according to Variety’s paraphrasing of screenwriter/director Tonya S. Holly this will be “a new adaptation of the story of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow rather than a remake of the 1967 classic film starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty.” Yes, it’s a horrible idea, yes it will be a horrible movie if it even makes it direct to DVD, let alone theaters, so naturally those cheeky monkeys at I Watch Stuff and /Film were quick to make some clever digs at the talent and resumés of those involved (Air Bud 3: World Pup, anyone?), but they have nothing on original Bonnie Faye Dunaway, who the Chicago Sun-Times reports gave poor ol’ Duffster the verbal equivalent of a wire hanger beatdown: ”Couldn’t they at least cast a real actress?” Two words: Mee. Yow. Saucer of milk, table two!

This gem of bitchiness brought to my attention by Big Screen Little Screen.

30
Jan
09

This Just In: R.I.P. Variety Asia?

hellokittyvader2
Hello Darth Kitty agrees that this Friday is definitely not Fun-day.

You heard it here first second third. Twitch has reported that Variety has laid off both Patrik Frater and Marcus Lim, (the editor-in-chief and web editor, respectively) of Variety Asia, which means Grady Hendrix’s essential Asian cinema blog Kaiju Shakedown will be shuttered as well. Thanks to reports like this one over at Nikki Finke’s blog, combined with the fact that Grady hadn’t posted anything in the earlier part of this week, I had a bad feeling this was coming. I’ve been reading Grady’s blog (in various incarnations) for years now, and his perfect combination of breaking news from abroad, insightful commentary on the industry, and scalding snark has been a constant source of joy. I would say it will be sorely missed, but then again Kaiju Shakedown has disappeared before only to rise, phoenix-like from the ashes, so I’m not counting it out just yet.